I need a credit card but I have bad credit?

Discuss the Visa & MasterCard payment networks as well as cards that operate through them.
DoingHomework
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Postby DoingHomework » Sun May 26, 2013 1:31 pm

MemberSince99 wrote:You know guys in all fairness, here, if you are out of it from a seizure and they put you in an ambulance and take you to the ER and you aren't capable of stopping them it's really not your fault over that.


I agree, and agree with the rest of what you said about doctors and dentists. SOME of them rack up charges.

But that does NOT happen in an ER if you do not have insurance. I know for a fact that a good share of the people they treat without insurance never pay and the hospital has to eat the cost of what is done. SO they nearly always only do the minimum. Now, I'm not saying that if you go in with a big "I have good insurance" sticker on your forehead that they would never throw in a few extra tests, but they aren't going to do it for the uninsured. That may be sad but that's the way it is.

In the OP's case he knows he get's seizures. He has an obligation to either carry insurance regardless of the cost or to make sure in some other way that this does not happen like a medical bracelet or something. As a matter of law there are certain circumstances when consent is implied an one of those in when a person is nonresponsize due to a seizure. So legally he gave consent.

Now, I'm not trying to beat up on him (or her). The past is gone and hopefully he learned his lesson. That's why I said he needs to be able to explain what he has changed so that the situation does not repeat itself. Has he gotten a backup insurance policy? Has he started wearing a medical bracelet? Similar questions regarding the other situations he got himself into.


DoingHomework
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Postby DoingHomework » Sun May 26, 2013 1:36 pm

MemberSince99 wrote:I've been tempted to put something in my wallet saying if I'm incapacitated let me die rather than run up 50k in debt.


Good idea. But if you are serious then you need to find out what your state's laws say about it. A wallet card in useless. In most states you need something registered with the Secretary of State or similar office. No first responder or other professional is going to honor a card they happen to find in your wallet for many reasons. In my state it is illegal to honor such a card. The doctor, nurse, or paramedic must see formal documentation with their own eyes before acting.

My wife and I have the kind of thing you speak of. It is not that unusual. But if you are serious you need to do it right.

MemberSince99
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Postby MemberSince99 » Sun May 26, 2013 2:21 pm

How do you carry insurance regardless of the cost?

Do you decide well I won't pay the rent so I will just be homeless and sleep under the bridge, but hey I have insurance?

That's just not a realistic outlook. Even this government which tends lie about the figures claims over half the country lives below the poverty level. I find that very easy to believe. And their poverty level is a life that isn't much if any better than a third world country. I've been to the third world so I know what they are like.

Might as well just not judge the guy.

I've spent time on unemployment, and I COULD have chosen to pay my COBRA instead of my rent, but frankly I didn't think the trade off was worth it, not to mention how then I'd be breaking my lease and good luck finding a place to live when you get a job.

hematino
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Postby hematino » Sun May 26, 2013 3:31 pm

DoingHomework wrote:I agree, and agree with the rest of what you said about doctors and dentists. SOME of them rack up charges.

But that does NOT happen in an ER if you do not have insurance. I know for a fact that a good share of the people they treat without insurance never pay and the hospital has to eat the cost of what is done. SO they nearly always only do the minimum. Now, I'm not saying that if you go in with a big "I have good insurance" sticker on your forehead that they would never throw in a few extra tests, but they aren't going to do it for the uninsured. That may be sad but that's the way it is.


I work in the ER, and I can honestly say that regardless of the insurance you have (or uninsured), we tend to do the minimum necessary to stabilize the patient, address their pain and get them either admitted or out the door. In fact the ER medical staff cannot even see what kind of insurance people have (unless the patient tells us), as the patient access team handles all of that, it's none of our business since by law, you will get treatment regardless. It's all about making sure we keep it moving. The emergency room is typically not where we "fix" patients' problems, we just do our best to medically stabilize them and either refer them to the appropriate services once they leave, or admit them to the hospital.

But we definitely do the minimum necessary for everyone like I said, despite all the people who come in demanding expensive stuff like MRIs. If it's not on an emergent basis, it's not gonna get done in the ER and people will have to follow up. Period. At least that's how it's done in my employer's healthcare system. The bigger concern over padding the bill is getting the people in and out so you can see more of them.
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DoingHomework
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Postby DoingHomework » Sun May 26, 2013 3:51 pm

hematino wrote:I work in the ER, and I can honestly say that regardless of the insurance you have (or uninsured), we tend to do the minimum necessary to stabilize the patient, address their pain and get them either admitted or out the door.


Exactly my point. I would leave open the possibility that there are some hospitals, if given the information that a patient has good insurance, might order the MRI (just to rule out something or to practice defensive medicine), but it would not be the norm.

With a seizure I would think it would have run its course or been stopped by the first responders. After that there would be a basic neuro exam, maybe a CBC, and a discussion with the patient. I can see that possibly going to $4k but I'd guess that the $4k includes collections and such or possibly there is more to it.

Either way, if the choice is between rent and insurance and you know you have a medical condition, you do pick insurance or you get your butt on medicare. That's how you carry insurance regardless of the cost.

The point is, I am not trying to judge or anything else. I'm just saying that if he wants a credit card he better be able to show that he has taken responsibility and ensured that the past problems will not repeat. Adults take responsibility and that is why we only extend credit to adults. Some people behave like adults when they turn 18 or 21, some not until their 40s or later.

MemberSince99
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Postby MemberSince99 » Sun May 26, 2013 4:08 pm

Ok I Googled Medicare and according to the information in Wikipedia, only those 65 and older, those with a disability or Lou Gehrig's disease or end stage renal disease may get Medicare.

What if he doesn't qualify, demand they let him in because DoingHomework insists on it?

Way too much judgement and too many quick and easy proclamations. This system is not kind to the poor or the working class as many of you should know.

Bksuper
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Postby Bksuper » Sun May 26, 2013 6:29 pm

Member, I don't think he's insisting you be on Medicare if you're not eligible for it, I think he was just listing it as an option if you were eligible. His point, as I understand it, is that health insurance should be your #1 priority if you have health conditions, and I completely agree with that. My conditions that I have at age 19 require planned, routine health care to the tune of $30-50k per year, I can't imagine what I'm going to need as I get older and/or have unexpected health needs. For now, I have very good insurance through my dad's employer, but my #1 motivation to go into a high paying field is to be able to afford that kind of insurance later.
Sole Ownership Cards:
1st Financial Bank Platinum Student Visa, $500 CL, Open Since 3/2012
Citi Forward Student Visa, $6k CL, Open Since 10/2012
Costco TrueEarnings Amex, $6k CL, Backdates to 1/2012
SallieMae Rewards Barclay Mastercard, $2.5k CL, Open Since 4/2013
Jointly Owned Cards (co-owner with mom, not AU, used and paid only by me):
Chase Amazon Rewards Visa Signature, $2k CL, Open Since 8/2012
US Bank Cash+ Visa Signature, $13.5k CL, Open Since 10/2012
Authorized User (Parents Pay/Use)
Costco TrueEarnings Amex $29.4k CL, AU since 11/2012

MemberSince99
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Postby MemberSince99 » Sun May 26, 2013 7:01 pm

I wasn't meaning to be aggressive in tone either. Just to point out that I've been in that boat, having to choose do you pay your rent or Cobra. Rent won every time. Then again I don't have health conditions other than allergies which is just an annoyance really.

But I understand, and I'm sorry about your health conditions Bksuper.

DoingHomework
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Postby DoingHomework » Sun May 26, 2013 11:02 pm

I meant medicaid, which is what you can get if you are poor.

I am not unsympathetic. But everyone needs a backup plan for everything. If know you have medical issues then insurance or otherwise preparing must be your top priority. Otherwise the rest of us pay your bills after the hospital gets screwed. I have better things to do with my money.

But again, I was just trying to advise the op to have a solid plan and be able to convince potential creditors that he has changed. That is not judging him. I know things happen when people are young. I was not perfect. But I did get my act together and figure out that I was the screwup and not the victim and that I had to change rather than blame everyone else.

Sevenfeet
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Postby Sevenfeet » Mon May 27, 2013 7:33 am

I could see the charge easily being around $4K once everything is added up. I've worked in payer insurance over my career for a major hospital network where I live and I've seen the claims that we got filed 20 years ago. Even the ambulance charge can be $500-$1000 by itself these days.

Not to mention that just two months ago I came into the the ER with a dislocated finger from a basketball injury. It's something I've done before (but not in over 20 years). Getting X-rays and getting the thing reset resulted in a bill in excess of $2000(!!). Insurance ate it for everything except the copayment. Now my insurance company has sent me a letter asking if someone else's insurance might be better to pay this than them (third party liability). Jackals.
Cards:
American Express Platinum (NPSL)
Penfed Platinum Reward Visa ($28K)
Chase Freedom Visa ($25K)
Fidelity American Express ($20K)
American Express Blue Cash Preferred ($20K)
Bank of America Cash Rewards MasterCard ($20K)
Citi Thank You Preferred Visa ($9.5K)
Chase Sapphire Preferred ($7.5K)
US Bank Cash + Visa Signature ($7K)
Discover IT ($4K)



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