Corporate Culture

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Indymac
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Location: Indiana

Postby Indymac » Sun Mar 30, 2014 11:20 pm

I was hired at my current job as a "contractor" with no benefits and told I would be hired as a full employee with benefits within 2 months. Instead, it was almost a full year before I was hired with full benefits such as a 401k and health insurance. While, I was certainly frustrated about my purgatory dragging on, my patience eventually payed off. It helped a lot that I like my job and coworkers and work with several people around my own age. It also helped that they sent me to several training courses while I was a contractor, which demonstrated their commitment to me because they weren't going to spend several thousand dollars on training me if they didn't plan on keeping me around.

I would advise those who are frustrated with their current situation to keep in mind that the grass is rarely greener. You should carefully consider whether your complaints are legitimate grievances or more annoyances that you can tolerate by blowing off steam every now and again.


JoDa
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Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 10:10 pm
Location: United States

Postby JoDa » Sun Mar 30, 2014 11:40 pm

Honestly, if it's that bad, maybe you do need to jump. Sure, the grass is always greener, but if I was so worked up about BS at work that I couldn't enjoy my Saturday morning in bed, I'd be looking to make a change right quick. I understand that the economy isn't great everywhere, but, from what I understand, you're currently renting, so who says you have to stay where you are? One of the reasons I have so much power is that my LinkedIn resume is ALWAYS public and my bosses know that I can and will move if necessary (not really necessary, since I already live in the big bad city and most of the jobs on offer (given my line of work) are 100% telework).

I know, I know...moving or moving into a telework job seems super-huge, but there are times you just have to do what's best for you, consequences be damned. I packed up and moved myself hundreds of miles TWICE early in my career. It was scary and I felt like a fool at moments, but you know what, it was ultimately in pursuit of my goals, and I knew that would ultimately be right.

Quick story time. Many, many years ago, in a land far away, I was terrified of flying. I had a bad flight...turbulence, air pocket...yada, yada, yada...and just the thought of getting on a plane turned me into a blubbering mess. But then, I was an international trade professional, and I knew I'd have to get over it at some point. Along comes this job that is everything I want, but requires flying all over the globe. I swallowed the lump in my throat, told my interviewers I was excited to travel, moved to a new city, and got the f on that first plane. I did the legwork before that happened (seeking counseling for my fear), but there was still a lot of bullet-biting (and armrest gripping) that went on. Now you can ship me anywhere and I only have a minor moment of hesitation when you tell me I'll be flying bum-f-airlines to nowheresville.

Perhaps it's foolish, but I try to do what is best for today and let the future take care of itself. If I found myself deeply unhappy (and I did, which is why I learned a new skill to get out from under my arse of a boss), then I'd change it. Life shouldn't be a constant state of frustration.
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JoDa
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Posts: 235
Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 10:10 pm
Location: United States

Postby JoDa » Sun Mar 30, 2014 11:55 pm

Indymac wrote:I was hired at my current job as a "contractor" with no benefits and told I would be hired as a full employee with benefits within 2 months. Instead, it was almost a full year before I was hired with full benefits such as a 401k and health insurance. While, I was certainly frustrated about my purgatory dragging on, my patience eventually payed off. It helped a lot that I like my job and coworkers and work with several people around my own age. It also helped that they sent me to several training courses while I was a contractor, which demonstrated their commitment to me because they weren't going to spend several thousand dollars on training me if they didn't plan on keeping me around.

I would advise those who are frustrated with their current situation to keep in mind that the grass is rarely greener. You should carefully consider whether your complaints are legitimate grievances or more annoyances that you can tolerate by blowing off steam every now and again.


It sounds like you had some reasons to stick out a hiccup in your plan (liked your work, liked your coworkers, your employer seemed interested in your advancement/skill development, etc.), and in a situation like that, I'd say you absolutely did the right thing. Jobs aren't being handed out like candy these days, and if you can get over 50% of what you want, then giving your employer some time to make good on promises to increase that percentage seems like a wise path. But if you're DEEPLY unhappy and suffering constant abuse/neglect in BASIC ways, then you need to look elsewhere. I'm not leaving my job because I have to pester maintenance to replace our frickin' light bulbs or even because I have to spend an hour once every few months explaining to HR that I did not "harass" the neighborhood unstable by not inviting him to lunch. Like you, I like a huge chunk of my coworkers, enjoy what I do, and get enough respect from my employer that I don't feel like I'm being taken for granted. Should any of those change, I'd first try to fix the problem, and if I couldn't, THEN look elsewhere.
CSP $19K
BOA $4K
UMP $11.5K
Target Visa $1.5K

MemberSince99
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Posts: 4913
Joined: Sun May 20, 2012 4:35 pm
Location: WI

Postby MemberSince99 » Mon Mar 31, 2014 5:47 am

Well I'm going to let the problem "fix" itself I'll just see what happens with the resumes being out there. That will tell me a lot of what I need to know.


It isn't going to change where I am, I have to accept that. So the best option is move on but that has to be realistic. I have to look out for my situation, because no one else is going to. It's just that simple and boils down to that.

linuxmachine
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Location: los angeles

Postby linuxmachine » Mon Mar 31, 2014 10:17 am

JoDa wrote:It sounds like you had some reasons to stick out a hiccup in your plan (liked your work, liked your coworkers, your employer seemed interested in your advancement/skill development, etc.), and in a situation like that, I'd say you absolutely did the right thing. Jobs aren't being handed out like candy these days, and if you can get over 50% of what you want, then giving your employer some time to make good on promises to increase that percentage seems like a wise path. But if you're DEEPLY unhappy and suffering constant abuse/neglect in BASIC ways, then you need to look elsewhere. I'm not leaving my job because I have to pester maintenance to replace our frickin' light bulbs or even because I have to spend an hour once every few months explaining to HR that I did not "harass" the neighborhood unstable by not inviting him to lunch. Like you, I like a huge chunk of my coworkers, enjoy what I do, and get enough respect from my employer that I don't feel like I'm being taken for granted. Should any of those change, I'd first try to fix the problem, and if I couldn't, THEN look elsewhere.


It's much different if you live on the west coast and work in tech. If you're the slightest bit unhappy you can leave and generally expect a raise as long as you wait a year. It's almost like card churning. Not many gardening going on because good talent is hard to find. You simply pay more as if it's an arms race. Of course you gotta be solid. This doesn't apply to entry level unless you're a grad at Stanford or Cal and work in the bay area... then you still get your 100k + bonus payday starting...

JoDa
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Posts: 235
Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 10:10 pm
Location: United States

Postby JoDa » Tue Apr 01, 2014 10:55 pm

You don't have to tell me or the world, but, Member, WHY can't you move? You don't have to give anyone a reason but yourself, but you should have a good reason. There are planes and trains and buses and cars that can get you back home to visit your family from time to time, no matter where you are, and sometimes even a small geographical change can make a world of difference. I won't pretend to know you that well, but I do know A LOT of people I graduated high school with who could "never" leave my hometown area, when moving less than 100 miles would open up a WORLD of opportunity for them. If there's opportunity where you are...great, go for it. But it sounds like there isn't.

Trust me, I know all too well how scary looking afield can be. My home cost *5 times* what my brother and SIL's did, and is much smaller (though nicer in many ways). But, you know what? I make enough that the cost isn't cumbersome. I would be FAR worse off where they are. You may have your own reasons to stay put, but don't let fear be one of them.

Also, don't let "rude people" be one of them. I know that whole Midwest meme...I GREW UP in the sort-of Midwest. Guess what? People in cities are actually nicer, by miles. We HAVE to be...we live ON TOP of each other...if we couldn't be decent, civilized people, all hell would break loose. We're just jerks to the tourists who respond to friendly suggestion like "could you please move away from the train door to let me off?" with "YOU ARE SUCH A RUDE BITCH I CAN'T BELIEVE HOW AWFUL YOU ARE!!!" at which point I forcefully shove them out of the way...
CSP $19K
BOA $4K
UMP $11.5K
Target Visa $1.5K



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