What people are missing in the whole Detroit saga

A place to discuss anything... except credit cards!
23 posts
Midori
Centurion Member
Centurion Member
 
Posts: 204
Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2012 10:25 am
Location: TX

Postby Midori » Mon Aug 05, 2013 7:16 pm

I'm thinking about buying an apartment complex in the next five years within a 100 mile radius of my home. Right now, I'm just window shopping. I'm looking at the age of the buildings, any recent renovations or improvements, the price per unit, the cap rate, occupancy numbers, number of units per complex, location, what sort of rents they pull in, etc, just to get an idea of what's usual for the area.

A major factor is going to be local bureaucracy. In my current locale, I rent out SFH's. I have to abide by federal law and I have to abide by state law. Good enough. But many of the markets I'm looking at have a ton of city ordinances that dictate all sorts of things... registration of my units (plus registration fees), mandatory recycling where I have to enter into a contract with an independent recycling company, annual inspections, annual inspection fees, reinspections plus reinspection fees, permits, how-many-unrelated-people-can-share-a-house, how-many-people-of-what-age-and-what-gender-can-share-a-room, what sort of locks I need to use, what sort of fences I need to surround my property with, what sort of security lighting I need, mandatory classes about crime prevention plus fees for attending those classes, how I need to have an emergency contact who can arrive at the property within 1 hour's time, etc, etc, etc.

Does all that really make me want to invest in that community?

Infrastructure is static. Once it's placed somewhere, it stays there. People are mobile. If people don't think that a place is the right climate for pursuing whatever business they're in, it won't matter how awesome the roads, parks, bridges, etc are... and they move elsewhere, and people get to build awesome new infrastructure somewhere else. Of course, it's not that straightforward because in your example, it's the federal government's dollar that's at stake, rather than purely private money. But I don't think that "thrifty" has been associated with government spending in a very long time. :oP


User avatar
djrez4
Centurion Member
Centurion Member
 
Posts: 1468
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2012 12:20 pm
Location: United States

Postby djrez4 » Mon Aug 05, 2013 8:45 pm

DoingHomework wrote: If for example the NSA wants to build a huge data center, why not put it in Detroit rather than Utah? Or maybe it's just a storage facility for archives....the point is, why not use the infrastructure that already exists? It saves everyone money and avoids the vicious circle we see happening in many places now.


Here's a fun one...

The chair of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (which I presume would have some say in where the NSA locates its facilities) is Rep. Rogers from Michigan. It has no members from Utah.

I presume the remote location in Utah allows for a level of security that is impossible in Detroit.
[RIGHT][size=100]- Sapphire Preferred - Freedom - Ink - Platinum - Everyday Preferred -[/size]
[/RIGHT]

DoingHomework
Centurion Member
Centurion Member
 
Posts: 707
Joined: Tue Sep 22, 2009 1:15 pm
Location: Arizona

Postby DoingHomework » Mon Aug 05, 2013 10:37 pm

djrez4 wrote:Here's a fun one...

The chair of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (which I presume would have some say in where the NSA locates its facilities) is Rep. Rogers from Michigan. It has no members from Utah.

I presume the remote location in Utah allows for a level of security that is impossible in Detroit.


Actually, I don't think it is that. I think the reason is that it's easy to dig underground in Utah without worrying about flooding. Much of the facility is underground. But really, even if they claimed it was for security I would not believe it. We can secure sites pretty well. You've got a few near you in Colorado, not just the Mountain either. You've got the Rocky Mtn Arsenal, pathogen and biowarfare storage facilities, nerve gas and other chemical weapon depositories, and much more. All of it is well secured.

Although I do know a guy that used to work in a top secret facility that built classified submarine parts. The facility was in a bad inner city neighborhood. It was a secure top secret facility yet they would have occasional break ins by people stealing things for scrap metal. Go figure.

I don't think it is any easier to secure a facility in remote Utah than it would be in Detroit. You may be right that there are no political pork reasons behind the placement. I suspect the reasons are technical.



Return to “The Lounge”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest
cron