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  1. #1
    Centurion Member FastSRT8's Avatar
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    Default Someone is using my address to get credit w/o permission

    I received a credit card statement (sent to my home address) addressed to a person I don't even know!

    I reported this to HSBC and told them I believe this is a scam.

    He makes payments in whole amounts so the card is not overdrawn BUT the fact he is using my address worries me.

    Is this a scam? How can they issue cards to people without checking their references or home address?
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    First of all,

    Does this person use your name? If not, you're safe.

    I would wonder how you figured out he makes payments in whole amounts as you state. If you opened this mail, you just violated the law and the Crown could certainly prosecute you.
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    The person on the credit card statement either must have lived at where you are currently living who forgot to call their credit card issuer to change address or the statement was sent to the wrong address by mistake. Also, it is possible that both parties messed up with entering the correct information. Like here at my city, there are two identical house or street number but with different street names.

    In any case, like JCarter stated, you are not permitted by law to open mailings especially those that are considered "confidential" or have sensitive information if the mailings are not addressed to your name even if same address.

    Not a scam unless it is addressed in your name. People move from place to place and they sometimes forget to fill out change of address or the issuer is still processing the request from the card holder.
    "Nearly all men can handle adversity, but if you really want to test a man's character - give him power." - Abraham Lincoln
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    Guys / Gals...

    I know what you are saying BUT here is what boggles my mind...


    THE address is brand new. We minted it as we built a new house. This address was never issued by the city so I know no one has ever 'lived' or used it.

    As for opening his mail, I think it's grey. The name was ultra suspicious (maybe I'm stereotyping) and I would rather be proactive than have the law enforcement come knocking at my door!
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    Quote Originally Posted by FastSRT8 View Post
    Guys / Gals...

    I know what you are saying BUT here is what boggles my mind...


    THE address is brand new. We minted it as we built a new house. This address was never issued by the city so I know no one has ever 'lived' or used it.

    As for opening his mail, I think it's grey. The name was ultra suspicious (maybe I'm stereotyping) and I would rather be proactive than have the law enforcement come knocking at my door!
    Possible things that happened:
    • The credit card issuer entered the wrong address in their system
    • The card owner entered the wrong street number and or street name on the form
    • If the card owner applied via phone, then maybe the agent entered the wrong info than the one the card owner told the agent.
    It is better to be proactive though. You are right on that one.

    Were you thinking that maybe it was from an illegal immigrant? What did HSBC tell you?
    "Nearly all men can handle adversity, but if you really want to test a man's character - give him power." - Abraham Lincoln
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    HSBC sent me right to their fraud dept.

    It just struck me as odd that the card holder kept making small round number payments every 2 weeks so as not to get the card to bounce.

    All these were flags to me that this was not 'normal'
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    Quote Originally Posted by FastSRT8 View Post
    HSBC sent me right to their fraud dept.

    It just struck me as odd that the card holder kept making small round number payments every 2 weeks so as not to get the card to bounce.

    All these were flags to me that this was not 'normal'
    That sounds like fraud to me....maybe your builder?
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    Quote Originally Posted by FastSRT8 View Post
    Guys / Gals...

    I know what you are saying BUT here is what boggles my mind...


    THE address is brand new. We minted it as we built a new house. This address was never issued by the city so I know no one has ever 'lived' or used it.

    As for opening his mail, I think it's grey. The name was ultra suspicious (maybe I'm stereotyping) and I would rather be proactive than have the law enforcement come knocking at my door!
    As an attorney the best advice I can give you is based on this:

    The address may be brand new, lets say it is 189 South Canuck Drive and you are the only person to live there. Yet, 3 miles away is 189 South Canuck Place which has existed for 50 years. Credit bureaus and issuers routinely use address verification services which could have messed this up and changed it as a minor mistake to your address.

    Just because the name seems suspicious to you, does not mean that it is fraud. That is profiling and you should refrain from it.

    There is no risk to you, as it is not YOUR name simply your address. Contact the postal service and have them notate that person X does not live at your address. They will refer that to anyone who attempts to send mail to your address.

    Finally there is not any "grey" area concerning the opening of mail. It is quite illegal, let me put it to you in an example in the harshest sense. Lets say you have a child called John. John turns 18 and still resides at your residence, and one day you receive mail for John while he is at school. You open said mail, and are upset that he has obtained a credit card in his own name and are quite concerned for his financial future so you address this with John upon his return home.

    John becomes quite upset and calls the RCMP for assistance. They would be able to arrest and prosecute you for a number of crimes...sending you to Kingston for a quite many number of years if you were to be convicted of them.

    It doesn't matter who it is, simply mark it in the future as "Person does not reside at this residence, RTS" the postal service will handle the rest.
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    Quote Originally Posted by FastSRT8 View Post
    HSBC sent me right to their fraud dept.

    It just struck me as odd that the card holder kept making small round number payments every 2 weeks so as not to get the card to bounce.

    All these were flags to me that this was not 'normal'
    HSBC can't speak to you, they do not know if you're phishing for information. Of course you're going to the fraud department.

    I routinely max out cards and make a number of payments monthly I assure you it is quite legal and normal.
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    Thanks JCarter for your insights.

    Always a lesson to be learned and one noted.

    There is just so much credit card fraud out there and I didn't want to be caught up in one especially since I do not have any time to spare.

    Thanks
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