A "friend" made $10,000 in unauthorized charges on my card!

Get credit card fraud help: For victims of credit card fraud and identity theft, and those that can help.
42 posts
User avatar
FastSRT8
Centurion Member
Centurion Member
 
Posts: 1454
Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 1:32 pm
Location: Canada

Postby FastSRT8 » Fri May 04, 2012 1:29 am

F that. I'd go on Facebook and politely bash the **** out of her. See how fast she gets back to you.
Carpe diem quam minimum credula postero!


jeffysdad
Centurion Member
Centurion Member
 
Posts: 875
Joined: Thu Apr 30, 2009 2:32 pm
Location: Texas

Postby jeffysdad » Fri May 04, 2012 6:27 am

Revenge is best served cold -- and discreetly. FB is not the venue for this as you could very well end up shooting yourself in the foot. One day you might be getting screened by an HR manager who ripped off her boyfriend, too. Where do you think her sympathies will lie? Legally, you could be snagged for harassment, although it seems unlikely and would be entirely unjust.

I don't know how you can get your money back or get even. Sorry. I really does suck.

For all the 20-somethings on this forum (and I gather there are a lot), the sooner you learn to run your personal finances like a business (if you don't do that already), the better off you will be. Exxon doesn't loan Chevron $100 million for no reason and without documentation. Nabisco doesn't let Nestle have unfettered access to its revolving credit facility. Well-managed companies under normal circumstances don't outspend their cash flow. When they borrow, they seek the most favorable terms. You get the idea...

Also, you don't want to know how much your boss, coworkers are making and you don't want any of them to know what you're making. Full stop. And anyone (EVERYONE!) who insists on getting married needs to have a prenup. I'm done now.
American Express: Blue Cash Preferred (groceries, 6%; gas, department store, 3%); Gold Delta SkyMiles (Delta Air Lines, 2 miles/dollar, free checked bag).
US Bank: Cash+ (utilities, phone, internet, restaurant, 5%; drugstores, 2%).
FIA Card Services: Fidelity Amex (everything, 2%); Fidelity Visa (everything, 1.5%).
Chase: Freedom (rotating, 5%); Amazon (Amazon.com, 3%); PriorityClub (IHG hotels, 5 points/dollar); Sapphire (not in use).

*All cards are registered with PriorityClub IDine program for 8 points/dollar at participating restaurants.

432521
Centurion Member
Centurion Member
 
Posts: 379
Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2012 3:15 pm
Location: USA

Postby 432521 » Fri May 04, 2012 8:56 am

jeffysdad wrote:Revenge is best served cold -- and discreetly. FB is not the venue for this as you could very well end up shooting yourself in the foot. One day you might be getting screened by an HR manager who ripped off her boyfriend, too. Where do you think her sympathies will lie? Legally, you could be snagged for harassment, although it seems unlikely and would be entirely unjust.

I don't know how you can get your money back or get even. Sorry. I really does suck.

For all the 20-somethings on this forum (and I gather there are a lot), the sooner you learn to run your personal finances like a business (if you don't do that already), the better off you will be. Exxon doesn't loan Chevron $100 million for no reason and without documentation. Nabisco doesn't let Nestle have unfettered access to its revolving credit facility. Well-managed companies under normal circumstances don't outspend their cash flow. When they borrow, they seek the most favorable terms. You get the idea...

Also, you don't want to know how much your boss, coworkers are making and you don't want any of them to know what you're making. Full stop. And anyone (EVERYONE!) who insists on getting married needs to have a prenup. I'm done now.


Totally agree, I am 19 and the first thing my dad and mom told me when i got my first credit card last year was to never give it to anyone. No friends because you never know who they really are even if I have known then for years. Once my friend was in dire need of some money to pay for something and asked me if she could borrow my CC. I told her straight up no because I didn't want to mix the two together. I am glad that she understood, I did help her in the end by actually going with her instead of handing her my card. We actually wrote out an agreement she signed I signed and I made sure to keep everything to make sure that none of my information would be with her.
March 2011- Wellsfargo Cash Back College Card
May 2012- Chase Freedom
May 2012- Discover IT
August 2012- American Express Blue Cash Everyday

branchpoint
Green Member
Green Member
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 5:15 pm
Location: Bellvue CO

Postby branchpoint » Fri May 04, 2012 10:07 am

432521 wrote:Totally agree, I am 19 and the first thing my dad and mom told me when i got my first credit card last year was to never give it to anyone. No friends because you never know who they really are even if I have known then for years. Once my friend was in dire need of some money to pay for something and asked me if she could borrow my CC. I told her straight up no because I didn't want to mix the two together. I am glad that she understood, I did help her in the end by actually going with her instead of handing her my card. We actually wrote out an agreement she signed I signed and I made sure to keep everything to make sure that none of my information would be with her.


Well, I'm 67 and my father was a lawyer, and no one ever told me you couldn't authorize just one use of a credit card. I never authorized her in writing or got her to sign anything. The other details I don't want to go into here because I if I can't get her prosecuted for fraud, I'll sue her. My main complaint about the law, as I understand it, is that it sure looks like something special set up to make things easier for the credit card companies to shirk their responsibilities to the consumer. I can't think of anything else where one use implies indefinite access. Does charging once give a merchant the right to charge you again and again? Lending cash out of your wallet give the borrower the right to whatever access he wants in the future? I don't think so.

User avatar
PlatinumAMEX94
Centurion Member
Centurion Member
 
Posts: 321
Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2012 1:21 am
Location: Denver

Postby PlatinumAMEX94 » Fri May 04, 2012 2:13 pm

branchpoint wrote:Well, I'm 67 and my father was a lawyer, and no one ever told me you couldn't authorize just one use of a credit card.


Citibank does virtual numbers for one time use. This would be a perfect example of why you would never give your credit card number to someone. I too have given out a number for someone to use it more than once. Lesson learned the hard way.
American Express Platinum Personal, Member since 94
Chase United Explorer - Visa Signature
Chase Sapphire Preferred
American Express Business Simply Cash

American Express Costco Business, American Express Platinum Business
Bank of America 10k, Capital One Venture World MasterCard 7.5k, Fidelity Visa Signature 10k
Citibank ThankYou Premier World MasterCard - Card Member since 91, 25k
Discover 10k Member since 91, Wells Fargo Personal & Business Visa Signature
USAA World MasterCard 12k, Chase Slate Exclusives Visa 5k

Lifelock member, USAA credit monitoring, Security Freezes E/E/TU, 800+

DoingHomework
Centurion Member
Centurion Member
 
Posts: 707
Joined: Tue Sep 22, 2009 1:15 pm
Location: Arizona

Postby DoingHomework » Fri May 04, 2012 6:02 pm

jeffysdad wrote:For all the 20-somethings on this forum (and I gather there are a lot), the sooner you learn to run your personal finances like a business (if you don't do that already), the better off you will be.

Absolutely!

jeffysdad wrote:Well-managed companies under normal circumstances don't outspend their cash flow. When they borrow, they seek the most favorable terms.

Correct. There is a government monopoly on that kind of behavior.

branchpoint
Green Member
Green Member
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 5:15 pm
Location: Bellvue CO

Postby branchpoint » Sun May 06, 2012 10:03 pm

PlatinumAMEX94 wrote:Citibank does virtual numbers for one time use. This would be a perfect example of why you would never give your credit card number to someone. I too have given out a number for someone to use it more than once. Lesson learned the hard way.


Thank you for that information. I had no idea about the virtual numbers. It's certainly not in the info I got from HSBC. Sounds like a good, simple solution for the future. But I still don't know whether this indefinite authorization is actually a law, an agreement in the credit card fine print, or just a court system too lazy to examine the details, which in this case make the fraud in it pretty clear.

JCarter
Centurion Member
Centurion Member
 
Posts: 323
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 10:40 pm
Location: Virginia

Postby JCarter » Wed May 09, 2012 3:02 am

branchpoint wrote:I authorized someone I thought was a friend to use my credit card to pay her utility bill one time in an emergency. She understood that and agreed never to use it again.

Seven months later she started using it at some of the same places she knew I shopped, without my knowledge or authorization.

I noticed nothing at first, but later after checking through my receipts, which she knew I habitually do only every few months, I discovered a total of over $10,000 in fraudulent charges.

Now the police tell me they can't go after her because authorizing her once created the presumption she could use it indefinitely, no matter what we had agreed or how ridiculous the situation became.

Is this actually true? It's crazy and unfair if it is. It means you can't ever let anyone else use your credit card number without incurring liability for whatever they might decide to do in the future. This makes no sense and is something I think would not occur to many of us.


False.

This would be the same as if you took your credit card to a merchant and authorized a purchase for $9. The merchant does not maintain the right to charge you that $9 and then turn around and charge you over and over.

Call your police department back, ask for a supervisor to be sent and file an internal affairs complaint demanding the retraining of the officers who falsely advised you. Advise the law enforcement officer/supervisor that you will take legal action against the department if they fail to act and protect you from such harm.

Second, swear out charges (some states allow you to do this directly, others require you petition the state's attorney/prosecutor for your district/locale) against said friend. Specifically you want a single charge for each individual purchase.

Review the following state statutes for applicability in each instance:

§18-4-401
§18-5-102
§18-5-113
§18-5-105
§18-5-903
§18-5.5-102
§18-9-309

Next, contact your state Attorney General's consumer affairs division for information regarding a possible identity theft passport or repair kit (names vary state to state).

If the state refuses to press any charge on your friend then you need to call Matthew Kirsch with the US Attorney District of Colorado Criminal Division. Mr Kirsch is the economic crimes chief.

You explain your situation to him and ask him to contact the US Secret Service and FBI on your behalf. They'll contact you to either come in to the field office or send an agent out to you. Be sure to tell him nothing but the facts, and do not attempt to liven up your story at all. Doing so places you at risk for prosecution under 18 USC 1001 (false statements), something you obviously do not want or need.

Lastly, you can sue her in civil court for damages (and any costs incurred), this is not a small claims case so of course contact an attorney concerning this matter.

Good luck, below are phone numbers/websites which may be of use.

Find-A-Lawyer, Colorado Bar Association (Colorado Bar, this will assist in obtaining representation in a civil matter)
FBI - (303) 629-7171
US Secret Service - (303) 866-1010
Agent Ralph Gagliardi (Colorado Bureau of Investigation) - 303-239-4287
- Agent Gaglirardi runs the Identity Theft Unit at CBI (Per Lexis, may have changed recently)
US Attorney District of Colorado (303) 454-0100

branchpoint
Green Member
Green Member
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 5:15 pm
Location: Bellvue CO

Postby branchpoint » Wed May 09, 2012 3:31 pm

Thank you very much. This is exactly the information I need.

JCarter
Centurion Member
Centurion Member
 
Posts: 323
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 10:40 pm
Location: Virginia

Postby JCarter » Thu May 10, 2012 11:07 am

branchpoint wrote:Thank you very much. This is exactly the information I need.


Glad to help. Keep us updated on the situation and how we can provide further advice.



Return to “Credit Card Fraud”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests