My 17 yr old son lied about age and got approved for card!

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Jsan5894
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My 17 yr old son lied about age and got approved for card!

Postby Jsan5894 » Sat Mar 10, 2012 1:02 pm

My seventeen year old son decided to apply for a secured MasterCard . Lied about his age but the rest of his information is correct. They approved him for the credit card and are now going to mail it to him. What could happen to him? Please reaping ASAP ! Thank you


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PlatinumAMEX94
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Postby PlatinumAMEX94 » Sat Mar 10, 2012 7:53 pm

Falsification of age or any information on a credit application could warrant some serious issues as it has now established a credit file with false information. I would contact the provider and tell them there has been a mistake on his application and it needs to be corrected, which will entail closing the account. They aren't going to throw him in jail, unless he tries to activate and use the card.
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Jsan5894
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Postby Jsan5894 » Sat Mar 10, 2012 10:19 pm

What if he waits til he turns 18 to activate it and use it ?

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Postby Money card » Sun Mar 11, 2012 1:13 am

then he's fine.

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Postby Jsan5894 » Sun Mar 11, 2012 7:06 am

Ok thank you guys you've both been a great help! Thank you once again

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Postby jeffysdad » Sun Mar 11, 2012 8:01 am

I wouldn't worry about it. It's not like he's in danger of getting drafted.
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PlatinumAMEX94
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Postby PlatinumAMEX94 » Sun Mar 11, 2012 2:20 pm

Jsan5894 wrote:What if he waits til he turns 18 to activate it and use it ?


There is this little thing called "Identity Theft" that the Feds and credit card companies don't like very much. And now you are in possession of a credit card that you cannot prove is you. Oops, wrong date of birth, not you. I wouldn't risk your entire future credit file because you were anxious to get a credit card. I wanted and had one when I was that age, but I had a cosigner.

On a side note,if you DO want him to start establishing credit, he probably could activate,use the card, make payments on time like everyone else. No one would really find out, and if the credit card company is dumb enough to give it to him, then so be it. You could also wait until he was 18, don't use the card now, and then call them and say that the date of birth is incorrect. Say that you checked his credit report and saw the inaccuracy, and then fax a copy of his drivers license, and they will fix it. Then when they report it to the agencies it will be correct.

The problem would be in the future (if you leave it as is) any credit he tried to apply would be flagged as there is an inaccuracy in the credit file, which is a nightmare to try and get corrected. I have seen situations where a SSN is incorrect (Dad/Son, same name situation) and it is very difficult to get resolved.

The bottom line is, Jsan5894, YOU are liable if anything happens. Just as if he went and committed a crime you would be in trouble, not him. So if you're okay with it and him using credit then go for it. You could also close that account and do it the right way, as a cosigner.
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Postby JCarter » Fri Mar 16, 2012 2:57 am

Actually I highly recommend you have him cancel the card, and not divulge that the reason you're doing so is that because he lied about his age. New Jersey can be very strange in the prosecution of cases and if the issuer decided to pursue charges, then the state would be obligated to prosecute him. The feds could very well get involved if the transaction affected any violation against Interstate Commerce, or use of a communications device to communicate cross-border. Meaning a computer to send an application to say, Capital One in Richmond, VA.

Specific statutes and language to consider:

2C:21-17 (Identity Theft/Impersonation)
It reads that he does not have to actually assume the identity of another, but intend to defraud using not his own truthful identity to obtain services, benefits or something from another person/entity.

2C:21-12 (Defrauding secured creditors)
This was after all, a secured card.

2C:21-4(b)(2) - (Falsifying or tampering with records):
b. Issuing a false financial statement. A person is guilty of issuing a false financial statement, a crime of the third degree, when, with purpose to deceive or injure anyone or to conceal any wrongdoing; he by oath or affirmation:

(1) Knowingly makes or utters a written instrument which purports to describe the financial condition or ability to pay of some person and which is inaccurate in some substantial respect; or

(2) Represents in writing that a written instrument purporting to describe a person's financial condition or ability to pay as of a prior date is accurate with respect to such person's current financial condition or ability to pay, whereas, he knows it is substantially inaccurate in that respect.

2C:20-25 (Computer Criminal Activity)
Presuming he did this on a computer, he has multiple violations of this code section.

My goal is not to scare you, but to let you know that what he did is actually a fairly serious act under New Jersey law, and having appeared many times in court on white collar cases against your current Governor (During his term as US Attorney), I can assure you they take them very seriously. (Sometimes too seriously). I recommend you advise him of how serious these acts are and to be far more cautious and patient in the future in his transactions.

The chances of them ever prosecuting the case, would be fairly low as they would need a complaining victim, and most credit card companies will not pursue such against a 17 year old regarding a secured card. But some will, and the smaller banks/issuers almost certainly do. So tread lightly.

Take care.

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Postby Celestine » Sat Mar 17, 2012 10:22 pm

Jsan5894 wrote:My seventeen year old son decided to apply for a secured MasterCard . Lied about his age but the rest of his information is correct. They approved him for the credit card and are now going to mail it to him. What could happen to him? Please reaping ASAP ! Thank you


Cancel the account. That is still considered fraud especially your son willingly lied about his age on the application.

I just don't get it why some user's here are indirectly suggesting it is ok.
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