597 Credit Score Because Mom Used My Credit When I Was 18

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Craze
 
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597 Credit Score Because Mom Used My Credit When I Was 18

Postby Craze » Thu Jan 19, 2012 4:21 pm

When I was 18 my mother used my personal information to open a Verizon wireless account, not identity theft, although I did not consent or know of it, she opened it to help build credit for me...

Well she stopped making payments for whatever reason and "I" owe them ~$2,500. This was 5 years ago, but now I am starting to apply for credit cards and loans, and it has come to haunt me, especially considering the only credit history I have is my current wireless account, which has always been payed on time and in full.

My credit score now is 597, I am 23, employed full time and a full time student. I have been declined for the American Express Delta Gold card.

My questions are..

1. Is there any way to transfer that Verizon account to my mother? The balance and all?

2. How much damage do you estimate it has done to my credit score?

3. My main reason for getting a credit or charge card is to build my credit, are there any that I have a chance of qualifying for with a credit score of 597?


sticf
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Postby sticf » Fri Jan 20, 2012 8:10 pm

1. I am not sure. It is under your name transferring debt like that is not really something that happens. They have reported it. It is on your credit report and the only way to get it removed (besides aging) is a dispute. That will be a hard sale.

2. The damage is bad. It is worse because you do not have a long history. My advice: Do what you have to do and make the bleeding stop. You need to figure out how to cap that bill and put it on a payment plan. Pay it off and then ride it out until it drops off.

3. There are secured cards. There may also be some other lower qualifications (credit re-builder type) cards out there. However, you can give up on some of the best rewards cards.

I do have a question. How is using another persons identity with out their permission "not identity theft"? If you were 18 when she did it you were an adult. She has no right to open an account in your name because she is no longer your "guardian". I am not saying you have to press charges but what she did is not right, or even legal (from my understanding of the law). She has done some damage to your credit score. However, with a good plan and time you can recover. Short term it will hurt, long term it will pass and be forgotten after a time.

Celestine
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Postby Celestine » Sat Mar 10, 2012 10:46 pm

Craze wrote:When I was 18 my mother used my personal information to open a Verizon wireless account, not identity theft, although I did not consent or know of it, she opened it to help build credit for me...

Well she stopped making payments for whatever reason and "I" owe them ~$2,500. This was 5 years ago, but now I am starting to apply for credit cards and loans, and it has come to haunt me, especially considering the only credit history I have is my current wireless account, which has always been payed on time and in full.

My credit score now is 597, I am 23, employed full time and a full time student. I have been declined for the American Express Delta Gold card.

My questions are..

1. Is there any way to transfer that Verizon account to my mother? The balance and all?

2. How much damage do you estimate it has done to my credit score?

3. My main reason for getting a credit or charge card is to build my credit, are there any that I have a chance of qualifying for with a credit score of 597?


First, using someone else' social security number without consent regardless of relationship is considered theft and fraud.

Regarding to your concerns...
1. If you mean removing that incident from your credit history, then you have to talk with the credit bureaus. If you mean the old Verizon account that is attached to your SSN, then you also need to talk to Verizon; depending on company policies Verizon might or might not transfer it.

2. It has done great damage. I assume that old Verizon account went into collections. It will stay in your credit history for less than ten years.

3. With your credit of 597, taking into account you are still a [full time] student with a full time job, either get a student credit card or a secured credit card. But I highly recommend getting a secured credit card since that type of card is usually used to repair a credit history.

Out of topic question... How do you go around being a full time student and have a full time job? Just curious... and to learn from your habits of studying full time and working full time. Either way... Good job on that study/work full time!
"Nearly all men can handle adversity, but if you really want to test a man's character - give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

Celestine
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Postby Celestine » Sat Mar 10, 2012 10:52 pm

sticf wrote:If you were 18 when she did it you were an adult. She has no right to open an account in your name because she is no longer your "guardian".


Regardless of the age of the SSN holder, it is theft/fraud/against the law to use someone else' SSN without the SSN holder's consent. Not sure about this but a parent/guardian can only use it for matters that directly affects the SSN holder or for official matters.
"Nearly all men can handle adversity, but if you really want to test a man's character - give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

JCarter
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Postby JCarter » Fri Mar 16, 2012 3:02 am

Celestine wrote:Regardless of the age of the SSN holder, it is theft/fraud/against the law to use someone else' SSN without the SSN holder's consent. Not sure about this but a parent/guardian can only use it for matters that directly affects the SSN holder or for official matters.


The attachment and ability to act under the authority of a minor ends upon reaching the age of majority (18) unless the minor is disabled and declared a ward, and the parent declared an agent-in-fact (Power of attorney) and guardian over the ward. So in short, no she can not legally have done this.

JCarter
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Postby JCarter » Fri Mar 16, 2012 3:13 am

Craze wrote:When I was 18 my mother used my personal information to open a Verizon wireless account, not identity theft, although I did not consent or know of it, she opened it to help build credit for me...

Well she stopped making payments for whatever reason and "I" owe them ~$2,500. This was 5 years ago, but now I am starting to apply for credit cards and loans, and it has come to haunt me, especially considering the only credit history I have is my current wireless account, which has always been payed on time and in full.

My credit score now is 597, I am 23, employed full time and a full time student. I have been declined for the American Express Delta Gold card.

My questions are..

1. Is there any way to transfer that Verizon account to my mother? The balance and all?

2. How much damage do you estimate it has done to my credit score?

3. My main reason for getting a credit or charge card is to build my credit, are there any that I have a chance of qualifying for with a credit score of 597?


In response to question number 1:
In short, yes. But, it comes at a price. You will need to file a police report, and contact Verizon Wireless' identity fraud section to start the process of removal. Once you have done that, they will file charges against your mother if they are able to. The way I interpret Texas Criminal Procedure Code 12.01 it is within the 10 year statute of limitations as it qualifies as forgery/uttering. It would be up to the state to prosecute the charge if they so desired, or decline to prosecute. Ask a local attorney for advice here.

In response to Question Number 2:
Considerable.

In response to Question Number 3:
There are many student cards, and cards for those with limited/no credit. Try those, along with secured cards to rebuild. If you remove the Verizon damage your score will go up, by how much I do not know.

As far as the Delta Gold Card goes, that would not be a good card to start with at AmEx, it requires more credit history than you have. Try for the Green Card if you really would like an American Express.

Good luck.

Celestine
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Postby Celestine » Sat Mar 17, 2012 10:20 pm

JCarter wrote:The attachment and ability to act under the authority of a minor ends upon reaching the age of majority (18) unless the minor is disabled and declared a ward, and the parent declared an agent-in-fact (Power of attorney) and guardian over the ward. So in short, no she can not legally have done this.


Thanks for the clarification on the use of the SSN of a minor.
"Nearly all men can handle adversity, but if you really want to test a man's character - give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

JCarter
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Postby JCarter » Tue Mar 20, 2012 11:05 pm

Not a problem at all. I just hope that the OP comes back to see this.



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