Merchants aren't allowed to require your ID

Get credit card fraud help: For victims of credit card fraud and identity theft, and those that can help.
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Postby Money card » Sun May 13, 2012 9:09 pm

FastSRT8 wrote:Actually, where does it state merchants are not allowed to get our ID? Is this a global policy in all countries?


They are allowed to ask for IDs if they feel something is wrong.


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danpass
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Postby danpass » Mon May 14, 2012 4:48 pm

heck, I write 'SEE ID' in the signature line

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FastSRT8
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Postby FastSRT8 » Mon May 14, 2012 4:51 pm

danpass wrote:heck, I write 'SEE ID' in the signature line


Now I think that's wrong. If you look carefully at the back of the card.... it clearly states "customer's signature" so unless your legal name is "SEE ID", I would not do that.

I think that exposes you to more risk as someone can create a fake driver's license with their photo AND their own signature which clearly they can recreate accurately at a moment's notice.
Carpe diem quam minimum credula postero!

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Postby 2percentPlus » Tue May 15, 2012 11:26 pm

FastSRT8 wrote:I don't know about that. I don't think you can ask anything you want. There are limits


It's not a job interview.

They can ask, but can't require ID. If you tell them no to showing ID, then they will probably not complete the sale. The customer won't win this fight.

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Postby American » Wed May 16, 2012 6:29 am

Technically SEE ID is a valid signature. Hell, the letter X is one. The problem is a merchant cannot verify based on matching signature if someone writes that on the back of his or her card.
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Postby DoingHomework » Thu May 17, 2012 12:34 am

American wrote:Technically SEE ID is a valid signature. Hell, the letter X is one. The problem is a merchant cannot verify based on matching signature if someone writes that on the back of his or her card.


I've heard various theories on whether it is better to have a consistent signature or better to scribble chicken scratch every time. It takes years of training to be able to match a true and correct, consistent signature. So basically, no clerk at a store is credibly qualified to do so. So I or Mr Carter could easily discredit any signature verification. I've known this for over 20 years and have intentionally varied and scribbled my signature. I have never once been questioned on it. Heck, the one time I got a speeding ticket I signed the ticket in a highly varied way...I mean like all over the ticket...and the cop did not give it a second look.

Let's face it, using signatures for ID is so old fashioned and dumb. If you want to know who you are dealing with you ask for government picture ID. If you don't care then just take cash.

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FastSRT8
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Postby FastSRT8 » Thu May 17, 2012 9:49 pm

DoingHomework wrote:I've heard various theories on whether it is better to have a consistent signature or better to scribble chicken scratch every time. It takes years of training to be able to match a true and correct, consistent signature. So basically, no clerk at a store is credibly qualified to do so. So I or Mr Carter could easily discredit any signature verification. I've known this for over 20 years and have intentionally varied and scribbled my signature. I have never once been questioned on it. Heck, the one time I got a speeding ticket I signed the ticket in a highly varied way...I mean like all over the ticket...and the cop did not give it a second look.

Let's face it, using signatures for ID is so old fashioned and dumb. If you want to know who you are dealing with you ask for government picture ID. If you don't care then just take cash.


So, what do you suggest we do to best protect ourselves?
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Postby DoingHomework » Sat May 19, 2012 10:07 am

FastSRT8 wrote:So, what do you suggest we do to best protect ourselves?


I already said it - government-issued ID. It's not foolproof by any stretch but it's pretty easy to verify and everyone carries it these days. If you have room for your credit card you have room for your driver's license. It's that simple.

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Postby WestCoast » Sun May 20, 2012 6:30 am

Both of the following are true:

1. Visa and MC merchants may not require ID from customers.

2. The states of Oregon and Washington (and probably others) have legislatively voided the parts of the merchant agreements that prohibited merchants from requiring IDs from customers.

So, when the recently paroled identity thief working at Office Depot, Best Buy, Disney or other fine establishment demands to see your ID to complete a credit card transaction and if you want to leave with your purchases you MUST provide ID.

These are stupid laws written and passed by stupid people with no regard for the security of the financial identities of the folks who elected them, but they are still the law.

I will not provide a potential identity thief with my home address or drivers license number. Depending on how cranky I am after being accused of credit card fraud I usually ask many questions like “why do you need my ID?”, “what are you going to do with it?”, “are you aware that you are violating your merchant agreement?” and “may I speak with your manager?” My purpose is variously to waste the establishment’s time, hold up the line and/or make the potential identity thief very uncomfortable.

Basically, being accused of credit card fraud is an insult and I return in kind.

If, I still need or want the merchandise that I’m trying to purchase with my credit card and after having done the above “moron drill” with store’s associates and or managers I present my US Passport Card which has my smiling picture on it. No home address or drivers license number on it. So far it works and I haven’t been asked for a drivers license since. It’s a $30 option for those that already have a US Passport and much more convenient than carrying an actual passport.

Want to do something about this problem? Stop being sheep! Say NO! It’s OK to say it. They won’t have you dragged away in chains just for saying no. They’ve accused you of fraud. Feel free to waste their time and make them feel uncomfortable. If enough customers do this, the merchants will change. Heck our elected officials may even become more educated on this issue... Yeah, that’s probably stretching it a bit...

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Postby 2percentPlus » Sun May 20, 2012 3:45 pm

Same here, sometimes I have gone on with them for 15 minutes and then given the manager my license and they act somewhat confused, "what's the big deal?". They are usually pretty let down that they didn't catch a big fraudster.



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