Any advice on chase debit/visa, child used

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jeffysdad01
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Postby jeffysdad01 » Sat Nov 29, 2014 6:46 am

If you could have the child prosecuted for fraud, that would bolster your case for reimbursement. Are you particularly fond of him/her?


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djrez4
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Postby djrez4 » Sat Nov 29, 2014 9:06 am

yfan wrote:^ None of these matter though, because they only apply to charges one is not legally responsible for. A parent is legally responsible for the charges their child makes.


I get that, but OP apparently doesn't, so I was bypassing the whole child aspect and trying to explain to him that even if his argument was properly founded in the law, he still loses.
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lobbythis
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Postby lobbythis » Sat Nov 29, 2014 1:14 pm

The only child here is the OP.

alexmt
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Postby alexmt » Sun Nov 30, 2014 10:59 am

yfan wrote:If your son fiddles with something at a toy store and breaks it, you better believe the store will charge you for it.


Whoa, there. No, you are not responsible for things you or your child break in a store! Unless it is intentional the store is taking on the risk by allowing you in and viewing the merchandise. So short of intentionally vandalising it, they are liable. If a store ever tries to charge you for broken merchandise 1. Tell them to pound sand. The police should side with you on this one and if they sue they should be laughed out of court. 2. Tell the world online what they tried to do so others know to avoid such a lousy store. The broken merchandise doesn't even cost them much as it is a write-off.

whit
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Postby whit » Sun Nov 30, 2014 12:27 pm

Jsub wrote:lol thank u for ur responses regarding my gremlin child and bad parenting. If u had any laws or regulations to cite it would have been a bit more helpful instead of opinions on parenting.

I suppose the parents of kids that commit school shootings or suicide are also bad parents ? Love the logic here :-)

Anywho there is a fiduciary responsibility that the bank must uphold due to federal laws regardless of inhouse policies. I cited federal law from an attorney msg board and cases the parent is not legally nor liable for charges made. Can always be fought regardless of bank policy they still must adhere to federal guidelines. So for future reference if anyone with gremlins has it happen to them read this post ; u will not be held responsible regardless of ur first answers from corporate. Google is ur friend use it and get ur charges taken care of.

Thanks for all the answers helpful ones and not



Quit tryin to fool people

You think that if this was true, what's to stop people from telling their kids, hey, I just *cough*cough* happen to leave my jacket here with my ccs, with you, while I go bathroom b/c I don't want any splash back.. Stay here in front of the vending machine of ps3s, game boys, beats, etc and don't go anywhere !!

Than later on, surprise surprise, there's a charge on there you don't recognize, and hey, my kid had a new PS3 but I don't know where that came from but the charge is "unauthorized" and therefore, I ain't paying for it even it turns out my kid did it and benefits from it

Because in your state if your child, under 18, hot wired a car and drove someone down and crushed their legs, you won't be liable for the damages your kid made because, it's your kid that did it and yes it was your car but it is "unauthorized"

Hopefully no one reading ur thread would be stupid enough to try and pull this type of scam and expect it to go through

It's not bad parenting, it's lesson learned, unless you let your kid off the hook without working to make up for what he took so easily for granted, probably not comprehending the depth of what he did, than that would be bad parenting.

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Postby popamode72 » Sun Nov 30, 2014 1:45 pm

lobbythis wrote:The only child here is the OP.


Yup. I think the OP is also a troll now.
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Brad Bishop
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Postby Brad Bishop » Sun Nov 30, 2014 2:12 pm

Jsub wrote:lol thank u for ur responses regarding my gremlin child and bad parenting. If u had any laws or regulations to cite it would have been a bit more helpful instead of opinions on parenting.

I suppose the parents of kids that commit school shootings or suicide are also bad parents ? Love the logic here :-)

Anywho there is a fiduciary responsibility that the bank must uphold due to federal laws regardless of inhouse policies. I cited federal law from an attorney msg board and cases the parent is not legally nor liable for charges made. Can always be fought regardless of bank policy they still must adhere to federal guidelines. So for future reference if anyone with gremlins has it happen to them read this post ; u will not be held responsible regardless of ur first answers from corporate. Google is ur friend use it and get ur charges taken care of.

Thanks for all the answers helpful ones and not


I think that the "bad parenting" responses we're a little over the top. You can be a good kid parent but the kid still does dumb things. The problem with this sort of stuff is that when someone posts something like this that it's easy to get on the perfect parent bandwagon.

That being said, he's still your kid and you're still responsible for him. If your kid did $400 of damage to my property it'd still be up to you to make me whole again. I don't see how this is any different. If I owned a store and your kid was caught stealing $400 worth of merchandise then I'd be coming after you and you'd still be responsible for your kid and, thus, responsible for the damage done.

It's not the app-seller's responsibility to guard your purchases. If your Amazon account gets a request to buy $400 worth of video games, then it's their job to ship them to you.

It's your job to manage your account, police your kid, and, unfortunately, pay for the damages - as much as I know how that sucks.

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Postby yfan » Sun Nov 30, 2014 2:14 pm

Jsub wrote:I suppose the parents of kids that commit school shootings or suicide are also bad parents ? Love the logic here :-)

Actually, yes, a case can be made for parental negligence there. But in most cases, the law makes a different assumption when children are in school - that when they are in school, they are under the supervision and responsibility of the school (provided they are enrolled), and the responsibility is transferred to the school. When a child is at home, the responsibility belongs to you as a parent.

This isn't about calling you a bad parent. This is about responsibility and liability. If your child is a great baseball player but accidentally breaks the neighbor's window, you are still liable for the damage, even if you taught your kid how to play baseball and have been an ideal parent. What WOULD BE bad parenting is refusing to pay to repair your neighbor's window and not holding your kid responsible in some way.

Anywho there is a fiduciary responsibility that the bank must uphold due to federal laws regardless of inhouse policies. I cited federal law from an attorney msg board and cases the parent is not legally nor liable for charges made.

No, you haven't. There have been no court cases that forces banks to pay for mistakes of the parents. There HAS been a couple of cases that went against device manufacturers/game creators for enticing children into buying and making the process not require some sort of security (like a password on iPhone, for example) to conduct the transaction. And there are no laws that transfer parental responsibility to card issuing banks when a child plays with your credit cards. What you have cited is what happens in case of unauthorized use, theft etc, which as I have said, is not your case.

But please, go ahead and fight. Hire these "lawyers" you found on some message board and sue Chase for $400. See how that goes.

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Postby CardySark » Thu Dec 11, 2014 6:10 pm

Like others have mentioned, since you are responsible for your son as his legal parent/guardian and since he is under age, then you are responsible for his debts if he cannot repay. This is similar to how parents are responsible if their underage son/daughter shoplifts, owes fees to a school or receives a ticket/citation. If they cannot pay, then the debt is yours, even if unauthorized and especially since it's on your personal account.

yfan
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Postby yfan » Thu Dec 11, 2014 8:47 pm

alexmt wrote:Whoa, there. No, you are not responsible for things you or your child break in a store! Unless it is intentional the store is taking on the risk by allowing you in and viewing the merchandise. So short of intentionally vandalising it, they are liable. If a store ever tries to charge you for broken merchandise 1. Tell them to pound sand. The police should side with you on this one and if they sue they should be laughed out of court. 2. Tell the world online what they tried to do so others know to avoid such a lousy store. The broken merchandise doesn't even cost them much as it is a write-off.

Lol, no. Intentional or not, you break it, you buy it. If your child breaks it, you bought it. You are free to test this in any store, of course, and see if the police "side[s] with you." This is common sense, because if it weren't this way, anyone who DOES intentionally break something would just claim it wasn't intentional and get away with it. And please please please try posting it online when they go after you because the ridicules on social media will be relentless. Besides, even if one were to ascribe to your theory, the child still intentionally used the card to make gaming purchases.



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