Chase Ink Bold vs Ink Plus: What’s The Difference?

The offer for the Chase Ink Bold business card is no longer unavailable and the offer for Chase Ink Plus business card is temporarily unavailable on creditcardforum. Any references below will remain for informational and comparison purposes only.

We’ve all seen the commercials for the Chase Ink. But then when you go on their website, it can be a tad confusing since they’re all so similar.

The confusion is more pronounced for two of Chase’s Ink business credit cards – the Chase Ink Plus and the Chase Ink Bold. Both have identical reward programs and the annual fees. So what’s the difference? It can be summed up one in sentence…

One is a charge card, the other is a credit card.

  • The Ink Bold is a charge card, which means you can’t carry a balance on it. When the bill comes in the mail, be prepared to pay the full amount because that will be your only option!
  • The Ink Plus is a credit card, so if you wanted you could use it to rack up debt (which I certainly wouldn’t advise). Or you can treat it like the Bold card and pay your bill in full every month, avoiding interest charges. The choice is yours.

Here is a comparison of the Ink Plus versus the Ink Bold. As you see, aside from the card design and ability to carry a balance, they’re essentially the same card.

 Ink PlusInk Bold
Annual Fee$95$0 Intro Annual Fee for the first year, then $95.
Interest Rate15.24% VariableNot applicable, because you aren't allowed to carry a balance on it.
Rewards
  • 5 points per dollar on the first $50,000 spent annually at office supply stores, and on cell phone, landline, internet, and cable TV services
  • 2 points per dollar on the first $50,000 spent annually at gas stations and hotels (when purchased directly with hotel)
  • 1 point per dollar on all other purchases, with no limits to how many you can earn
  • 5 points per dollar on the first $50,000 spent annually at office supply stores, and on cell phone, landline, internet, and cable TV services
  • 2 points per dollar on the first $50,000 spent annually at gas stations and hotels (when purchased directly with hotel)
  • 1 point per dollar on all other purchases, with no limits to how many you can earn
Airport Lounge AccessYes, free membership in Lounge Club, which includes 2 free lounge visits per year. After that, it's $27 per visit. More details below.Yes, free membership in Lounge Club, which includes 2 free lounge visits per year. After that, it's $27 per visit. More details below.
1:1 point transfer to participating airlines and hotelsYesYes
Free Employee CardsYesYes
No Foreign Transaction FeesYesYes
20% off travel redemptions through Chase Ultimate RewardsYesYes
Signup BonusNot availableNot available

Both of these come with all the features and small business-related discounts and perks you would expect on a card of this caliber; Purchase & Extended Protection, Trip Cancellation/Interruption Coverage (huge when footing your own travel expenses), Auto Rental Collision Damage Waiver (big savings), and even Price Protection (that’s a perk you won’t even find on an Amex Platinum). Obviously there are terms and conditions for all of these benefits, contact Chase for those.

Lounge ClubLounge Club: I want to touch on this specific benefit because not as many people have heard of Lounge Club. It’s actually owned by Priority Pass and is almost exactly the same! The biggest difference I can see is that the United Clubs are excluded, which leaves you with a total of 350+ lounges versus the 600+ you get with Priority Pass Select.

I’ve seen the Lounge Club springing up on various credit cards over the past couple years, as it appears to be a replacing Priority Pass Select. The reason they have to do this is obvious… United stopped accepting entrance to their clubs from third-party credit cards.

Airline & Hotel Transfer Partners: You can transfer your points to the following travel loyalty programs on 1:1 basis:

  • Southwest Airlines Rapid Rewards
  • Hyatt Gold Passport
  • United Airlines Mileage Plus
  • Marriott Rewards
  • British Airways Avios
  • Ritz-Carlton Rewards
  • InterContinental Hotels Priority Club
  • Korean Air Skypass

To sum it all up, here are the pros versus the cons…

Pros?

  • Exceptionally lucrative signup offer
  • Generous rewards program, even better than what personal credit cards offer.
  • Points to frequent flyer miles on a 1 to 1 conversion basis.
  • Excellent selection of cardmember benefits and perks.

Cons?

  • Annual fee, but fortunately it’s waived for the first year. If you still don’t like the sound of that, then the no annual fee Ink Cash might make more sense for you, but the signup bonus is smaller and you don’t get 1:1 transfer of points. If you spend a fair amount on items earning 5 points/$ the rewards easily justify the annual fee, though.
  • Chase Ink Bold doesn’t let you carry a balance (but maybe that’s a good thing?)

By the way you can apply for Ink Plus as an individual, which is a sole proprietor. If you do that you will enter your legal name for the business name – i.e. if your legal name is John Smith, you also have to use that for your business name unless you have a separate DBA. For the business tax ID you enter your Social Security number.

 
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Thanks for the heads up, I was wondering what is the difference between the Ink cards.